children

DIR-Floortime therapy: Refurbishing the relationship with your child through play

In our latest blog, Child and Adolescent Psychotherapist Zuzana Camm, tells us about DIR-Floortime therapy, and how it’s become her life mission to help parents who are finding it hard to connect with their child.

To make an appointment with Zuzana or speak to her about your concerns, please call us on 0208 6737930.

Educational Psychology

In our new blog, our new Educational Psychologist, Carmel, gives us more information about when to involve an educational psychologist in your child’s education and what is involved in the process…

Tears, trials and tantrums: a special workshop for parents

Ever feel like you are often in conflict with your child? It’s true, children’s brains work differently to adults. Children’s therapist Katie Trusty is running a special workshop to help parents understand early behaviour and improve communication skills. Katie used to be part of the Children’s Therapies team and talked to us about the workshop.

Tackling toddler tantrums: 6 tips to make a big difference

Every parent knows tantrums can be really hard to deal with. Lorna Davis, our Speech and Language Therapist (and mum of a 2 year-old tantrum professional) tells us how language development can play into tantrums, and her top tantrum tactics.

“Toddlers have only just started learning language. A two year-old usually only has around 50-100 words - that’s not a lot to express all the complex range of emotions they feel. No matter how well you know your child, it’s easy to misunderstand what they are trying to say sometimes.

“For a toddler this can be really frustrating, and is a common trigger for tantrums. If your toddler has a speech delay or disorder, this might be even more marked. But for all children, regardless of their speech development, a few key things can make a big difference.

5 autism myths debunked

According to The National Autistic Society, more than 1 in 100 people in the UK have autism. But there’s still so many myths out there around children living with autism, and what it means for them and their families. We caught up with psychologist Daniela Diciano to debunk the most common myths about autism.

The Role Of Messy Play

Getting messy helps us process confused thoughts and feelings

There is a connection between psychological and physical ‘mess.’  When our thoughts and feelings are confused or chaotic, this can spill over into our physical lives.  The opportunity to express these thoughts and feelings through the use of physical materials helps us to make sense of the chaos and gives us the chance to reorder things within our minds.